Logo Rationale

When presenting logo concepts to our clients, we like to help them both understand and visualise the thinking behind the logo design we have created. How do we achieve this? With a logo design rationale…

 

Quite a bit goes into our logo design process here at Nerve, and we like to start this process by discussing what makes the brand unique, why the business does what it does and what staff and customers think of the brand. How does it make people feel?

Approaching a logo design this way gives our designers a source of ideas to work from, and these ideas will be forged into logo concepts. But how do we help the client understand how each concept came to be? With a logo design rationale.

logo design chesterfield

What should a logo rationale cover?

To best communicate what was going on in the designer’s mind when a logo concept was put together, a logo rational should cover the following:

Colour: 

A logo rationale should explain the colours used in the concept. Why were they chosen? What does each colour represent? How does the colour choice relate to you, the client? Occasionally, colour isn’t a part of the first batch of concepts, but when it is, it should be included in the rationale so you understand why the designer has used each colour. You can read more about choosing a colour palette here.

Symbolism: 

A rationale should clarify and identify the meanings behind the icon each design has incorporated. Why are some elements transparent? What is that slash there? Your logo rationale should explain this in detail.

Typography: 

The choice of font used in your logo design is incredibly important, and often subjective. It is important to stand why a typeface has been recommended in your logo concept. A bold typeface and a tall, thin typeface will both achieve very different things, and your designer should clarify this decision to you. 

Magnavale Logo Design Rationale
Relatability:

This one is important, and should at least be referenced throughout your rationale a couple of times. How does the concept (and individual elements of the design) reflect your company’s goals, values and vision? Your company logo should be a representation of your company and what it means. Most of these points should have been taken down at the point of briefing your designer.

 

Remember- you are the customer.

While it is important for you to trust your designer, ultimately the decision lies with you. Taking their concepts on board is important, but your designer should be taking your individual tastes into consideration.

If you are looking for a logo designer for your company, and would like to discuss how Nerve could help, please get in touch. Here are some examples of our recent logo designs:

 

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